Articles

Copyright, Public Policy, and Information Technology

Science  01 Feb 1974:
Vol. 183, Issue 4123, pp. 384-391
DOI: 10.1126/science.183.4123.384

Abstract

Photocopying, computing, and other neopublishing technologies may threaten the traditional foundations of the creation of knowledge and simultaneously promise ever-faster creation of scholarly insights and social decision-making. Conversely, copyright law maintains accepted patterns of data-production and may hinder increased rates of research and information-based decision-making. These are multiple dilemmas, and must be faced squarely in formulating new policies for new technologies.

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