Abstract

Cultures of L-929 and WI-38 cells, frozen to 4.2 degrees K and exposed for 4 to 8 hours to 5000-oersted magnetic fields, were markedly inhibited in their growth as compared to controls. In cultures grown on cover slips, approximately 7 days after exposure, morphologically distinct cells emerged and were propagated from generation to generation; 3 weeks later, in flask cultures, contact inhibition was abolished. It is concluded that under certain experimental conditions, strong magnetic fields induce morphological and physiological transformations of target cells.

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