Abstract

The effect of the anion associated with sodium loading on the development of hypertension in the Dahl salt-sensitive rat was determined. For 5 weeks rats were fed a diet containing normal or high concentrations of sodium chloride or high concentrations of sodium provided as a mixture of sodium bicarbonate, phosphate, and amino acids. After 1 week on these diets and until the end of the study the rats receiving high concentrations of sodium chloride had higher systolic blood pressures than the rats in the other two groups. There were no statistically significant group differences in plasma volume, arterial pH, or plasma concentrations of Na+, K+, Cl-, Ca2+, or creatinine, or in renomedullary prostaglandin E2 production. Compared to the animals receiving normal concentrations of sodium chloride, those receiving high concentrations of sodium chloride or amino acids showed decreased plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone concentrations. Thus, the anion ingested with sodium alters the development and severity of hypertension in the Dahl salt-sensitive rat.