Introduction to special issue

Cell Division: How DNA Replication Originates

Science  08 Dec 1995:
Vol. 270, Issue 5242, pp. 1585-1587
DOI: 10.1126/science.270.5242.1585

Summary

As the cells of higher organisms prepare to divide, they face a tremendous logistic problem: How to copy all of their DNA once—and only once—and at exactly the right time in the cell cycle. Now, in work done mainly in yeast, researchers are finding that this exquisite control of DNA replication is achieved by a complex of proteins interacting with specific short DNA sequences. They've also identified several of the proteins that form the complex, and begun to show how they tie into the machinery of the cell cycle. Work with mammals and other higher eukaryotes is less advanced, but early results suggest that these species use similar proteins for controlling DNA replication.

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