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Scorecard '97

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Science  18 Dec 1998:
Vol. 282, Issue 5397, pp. 2159
DOI: 10.1126/science.282.5397.2159

Last December, we picked six fields to watch in 1998. Here's what happened to our favorites, showing whether our crystal ball was cloudy or clear.

Personalized prescriptions.

Ever faster, cheaper DNA screening techniques have made so-called pharmacogenetics—tailoring drug treatment to patients' genetic makeup—all the rage. But although one breast cancer treatment now targets women with a particular genetic makeup, there's no real proof that such genotyping is yielding better therapies.

Forecasting future shocks.

Score two for climate forecasters, who in 1998 pitched timely forecasts of both the weather effects of the 1997–98 El Niño and last spring's switch to the opposite condition, La Niña. In the new frontier of decadal predictions, researchers pinned down oscillations in the ocean-atmosphere system from the Arctic to the Pacific and the tropics.

The expanding universe.

Last year when a few distant stellar explosions showed that cosmic expansion wasn't slowing as expected, Science predicted that more data would yield big news. In this case our crystal ball saw as clearly as the finest telescope: Results from dozens of explosions are the basis of 1998's Breakthrough of the Year (p. 2156). But we also got a surprise: The new data show that the cosmos isn't slowing at all but speeding up, with profound implications for physics and cosmology.

Figure
The expanding universe.

Last year when a few distant stellar explosions showed that cosmic expansion wasn't slowing as expected, Science predicted that more data would yield big news. In this case our crystal ball saw as clearly as the finest telescope: Results from dozens of explosions are the basis of 1998's Breakthrough of the Year (p. 2156). But we also got a surprise: The new data show that the cosmos isn't slowing at all but speeding up, with profound implications for physics and cosmology.

Figure
The expanding universe.

Last year when a few distant stellar explosions showed that cosmic expansion wasn't slowing as expected, Science predicted that more data would yield big news. In this case our crystal ball saw as clearly as the finest telescope: Results from dozens of explosions are the basis of 1998's Breakthrough of the Year (p. 2156). But we also got a surprise: The new data show that the cosmos isn't slowing at all but speeding up, with profound implications for physics and cosmology.

Figure
The expanding universe.

Last year when a few distant stellar explosions showed that cosmic expansion wasn't slowing as expected, Science predicted that more data would yield big news. In this case our crystal ball saw as clearly as the finest telescope: Results from dozens of explosions are the basis of 1998's Breakthrough of the Year (p. 2156). But we also got a surprise: The new data show that the cosmos isn't slowing at all but speeding up, with profound implications for physics and cosmology.

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