PerspectiveNeurobiology

Brain, Heal Thyself

Science  19 Feb 1999:
Vol. 283, Issue 5405, pp. 1126-1127
DOI: 10.1126/science.283.5405.1126

You are currently viewing the summary.

View Full Text

Via your Institution

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution


Summary

The brain cannot repair itself after injury. Or so goes the dogma. In his Perspective, Lowenstein outlines recent results that indicate that quiescent progenitor cells and the growth factors to bring them to maturity are actually present, sequestered and silent, in the adult brain. Injury may partially trigger their activation. The current research challenge is how to persuade them to fully repair injured brain tissue.

Related Content