Review

Emerging Roles of Ubiquitin in Transcription Regulation

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Science  17 May 2002:
Vol. 296, Issue 5571, pp. 1254-1258
DOI: 10.1126/science.1067466

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Abstract

Ubiquitin is a small protein that was initially found to function as a tag that can be covalently attached to proteins to mark them for destruction by a multisubunit, adenosine 5′-triphosphate–dependent protease called the proteasome. Ubiquitin is now emerging as a key regulator of eukaryotic messenger RNA synthesis, a process that depends on the RNA synthetic enzyme RNA polymerase II and the transcription factors that control its activity. Ubiquitin controls messenger RNA synthesis not only by mechanisms involving ubiquitin-dependent destruction of transcription factors by the proteasome, but also by an intriguing collection of previously unknown and unanticipated mechanisms that appear to be independent of the proteasome.

  • * To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: jlc{at}stowers-institute.org

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