EXHIBIT: The Sweet Story of Insulin

Science  31 Oct 2003:
Vol. 302, Issue 5646, pp. 757
DOI: 10.1126/science.302.5646.757a

Few scientists ever enjoy as fruitful a 5 years as Frederick Banting, J. J. R. Macleod, James Collip, and Charles Best. In 1921 and 1922, the researchers isolated insulin and demonstrated its power to ameliorate diabetes. By 1926, doctors around the world were treating patients with the hormone. Delve into the discovery and early use of insulin at this site from the University of Toronto, where the researchers performed much of the work. You can browse some 7000 documents, including the investigators' letters, notebook pages, landmark papers on insulin, and photos. The site also offers a timeline, biographies of the scientists, and writings from grateful early patients.

Insulin's history has its sour moments, as newspaper clippings on the site reveal. The Nobel committee awarded the 1923 prize for physiology or medicine to Macleod and Banting, snubbing Best and Collip and fomenting a brouhaha over credit that continues today. However, the winners shared the prize money with their overlooked colleagues.


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