Report

Suppression of MicroRNA-Silencing Pathway by HIV-1 During Virus Replication

+ See all authors and affiliations

Science  16 Mar 2007:
Vol. 315, Issue 5818, pp. 1579-1582
DOI: 10.1126/science.1136319

You are currently viewing the abstract.

View Full Text

Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded noncoding RNAs of 19 to 25 nucleotides that function as gene regulators and as a host cell defense against both RNA and DNA viruses. We provide evidence for a physiological role of the miRNA-silencing machinery in controlling HIV-1 replication. Type III RNAses Dicer and Drosha, responsible for miRNA processing, inhibited virus replication both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1–infected donors and in latently infected cells. In turn, HIV-1 actively suppressed the expression of the polycistronic miRNA cluster miR-17/92. This suppression was found to be required for efficient viral replication and was dependent on the histone acetyltransferase Tat cofactor PCAF. Our results highlight the involvement of the miRNA-silencing pathway in HIV-1 replication and latency.

View Full Text