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Fast Synaptic Subcortical Control of Hippocampal Circuits

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Science  16 Oct 2009:
Vol. 326, Issue 5951, pp. 449-453
DOI: 10.1126/science.1178307

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Subcortical Network Regulation

Subcortical neuromodulatory centers dominate the motivational and emotional state–dependent control of cortical functions. Control of cortical circuits has been thought to involve a slow, diffuse neuromodulation that affects the excitability of large numbers of neurons relatively indiscriminately. Varga et al. (p. 449) describe a form of subcortical control of cortical information processing whereby strong, spatiotemporally precise excitatory input from midbrain serotonergic neurons produces a robust activation of hippocampal interneurons. This effect is mediated by a synaptic release of both serotonin and glutamate and impacts network activity patterns.

Abstract

Cortical information processing is under state-dependent control of subcortical neuromodulatory systems. Although this modulatory effect is thought to be mediated mainly by slow nonsynaptic metabotropic receptors, other mechanisms, such as direct synaptic transmission, are possible. Yet, it is currently unknown if any such form of subcortical control exists. Here, we present direct evidence of a strong, spatiotemporally precise excitatory input from an ascending neuromodulatory center. Selective stimulation of serotonergic median raphe neurons produced a rapid activation of hippocampal interneurons. At the network level, this subcortical drive was manifested as a pattern of effective disynaptic GABAergic inhibition that spread throughout the circuit. This form of subcortical network regulation should be incorporated into current concepts of normal and pathological cortical function.

  • * These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Present address: Department of Neuroscience, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.

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