About the Cover

26 November 2010
Vol 330, Issue 6008

About the Cover

Cover image expansion

COVER A domestic cat (Felis catus) laps milk by lowering its tongue to touch the liquid surface and then rapidly pulling it up, creating a liquid column, the top of which the animal captures in its mouth before gravity draws it down. Measurements of lapping frequency in domestic and wild cats suggest that this mechanism is conserved among felines and that lapping frequency is tuned to maximize the ingested volume per lap. See page 1231. Photo: Micaela Pilotto, Pedro Reis, Roman Stocker

About The Cover

Cover image expansion

COVER A domestic cat (Felis catus) laps milk by lowering its tongue to touch the liquid surface and then rapidly pulling it up, creating a liquid column, the top of which the animal captures in its mouth before gravity draws it down. Measurements of lapping frequency in domestic and wild cats suggest that this mechanism is conserved among felines and that lapping frequency is tuned to maximize the ingested volume per lap. See page 1231. Photo: Micaela Pilotto, Pedro Reis, Roman Stocker