Malaria in the Post-Genome Era

Science  05 Oct 2012:
Vol. 338, Issue 6103, pp. 49-50
DOI: 10.1126/science.1229177

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Ten years ago, the genome sequence of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae, the most important vector of malaria in Africa, and the genome sequence of Plasmodium falciparum, the most dangerous human malaria parasite, were published (1, 2). It was anticipated that these remarkable pieces of research heralded a bright future for malaria control. Has this happened? The genome projects have made some contribution to the development of new malaria tools, such as new vaccine candidates, but a decade is probably too short a period for the research to be translated into success in the field. Knowledge gained from the genome projects may contribute more substantially in the coming decade as efforts to control infection increasingly focus on development of new drugs, insecticides, and vaccines.