Findings

Science  23 Nov 2012:
Vol. 338, Issue 6110, pp. 1015
  1. Einstein's Brain Reveals Genius

    Singular mind.

    A new analysis of Einstein's brain yields clues to his genius.

    CREDIT: THE IMAGES OF EINSTEIN'S BRAIN ARE PUBLISHED IN FALK, LEPORE, & NOE (2012), THE CEREBRAL CORTEX OF ALBERT EINSTEIN: A DESCRIPTION AND PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF UNPUBLISHED PHOTOGRAPHS, BRAIN (DOI #DOI:10.1093/BRAIN/AWS295) AND ARE REPRODUCED HERE WITH PERMISSION FROM THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF HEALTH AND MEDICINE, SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND

    It took a special brain to come up with the theory of relativity. Newly discovered photographs of Albert Einstein's brain reveal many extra folds and convolutions—but it's not clear how they translated into his amazing abilities.

    When Einstein died in 1955, the examining pathologist, Thomas Harvey, photographed the scientist's brain and cut it into 240 blocks. Now, in a study published online on 15 November in Brain, researchers led by anthropologist Dean Falk of Florida State University in Tallahassee analyzed 14 photographs of the whole brain from the Harvey collection that have never before been made public.

    When compared with 85 human brains in the scientific literature, Einstein's brain is special, the team found. Although average in size, the brain has several regions with unusual twists and folds. For example, regions on the left side of the brain connected to the face and tongue are much larger than normal, as is his prefrontal cortex, which is linked to planning, focused attention, and perseverance.

    http://scim.ag/Einsteinbrain

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