Cell Biology

Neutrophil Knowhow

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Science  30 Aug 2013:
Vol. 341, Issue 6149, pp. 938-939
DOI: 10.1126/science.341.6149.938-d
CREDIT: S. KAMAKURA ET AL., DEVELOPMENTAL CELL 26, 3 (25 JULY 2013) © 2013 ELSEVIER INC.

Chemotaxis involves the movement of cells along an attractant gradient and is important, for example, in the migration of neutrophils toward sites of infection. Chemotaxis requires both increased motility and sustained directionality. The molecular mechanisms involved in directionality control are largely unknown. Working with mouse neutrophils, Kamakura et al. found that the directional movement of neutrophils was regulated via a heterotrimeric G protein signaling pathway. Chemoattractant binding to G protein–coupled receptors induced accumulation of the GDP-bound Gαi subunit at the front of migrating neutrophils, where it recruited the conserved cell polarity protein mInsc. Neutrophils lacking mInsc, although motile, were unable to stay the course and failed to stabilize pseudopods appropriately at the leading edge.

Dev. Cell 26, 292 (2013).

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