Proteostasis

Need proteasomes? Make some!

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Science  29 Aug 2014:
Vol. 345, Issue 6200, pp. 1017
DOI: 10.1126/science.345.6200.1017-a

Adc17 modifies proteasomes levels

ILLUSTRATION: BRYCE SMALL/STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Cells need to clear out damaged proteins, or they age and become unhealthy. To do this, cells use tiny protein-destroying machines called proteasomes. Building these proteasomes is a complex process, and it's not clear how stressed cells can make sure the proteasome supply meets demand. Working with yeast cells, Hanssum et al. discovered a protein that helps cells assemble just enough proteasomes to fit their needs. In a process called chaperoning, the protein, which they called Adc17, helps pair two proteasomal proteins, Rpt6 and Rpt3, during proteasome assembly.

Mol. Cell 10.1016/j.molcel.2014.06.017 (2014).

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