In DepthPaleontology

Giant dinosaur was a terror of Cretaceous waterways

Science  12 Sep 2014:
Vol. 345, Issue 6202, pp. 1232
DOI: 10.1126/science.345.6202.1232

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Summary

Researchers have long debated whether dinosaurs could swim, but there has been little direct evidence for aquadinos. Some tantalizing hints have appeared, however, in claimed "swim tracks" made by the bellies of dinos in Utah and oxygen isotopes indicating possible aquatic habitats in a group of dinosaurs called spinosaurs. Now, a research team working in Morocco has found the most complete skeleton yet of a giant carnivore called Spinosaurus, very fragmentary remains of which were first discovered in 1912 in Egypt. The new fossils not only confirm that Spinosaurus was bigger than Tyrannosaurus rex, but also show that it had evolutionary adaptations—ranging from pedal-like feet to a nostril far back on the head to high bone density like that of hippos—clearly suited for swimming in lakes and rivers.

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