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Unknown significance

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Science  05 Dec 2014:
Vol. 346, Issue 6214, pp. 1167-1170
DOI: 10.1126/science.346.6214.1167

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Summary

The list of cancer risk genes is growing rapidly, and the cost of sequencing many genes at the same time has plunged. The result: Genetic tests now include dozens of genes. But technology is outpacing our ability to interpret the DNA that's decoded. How much does a particular variant change risk for an individual? What might it mean for a family? Researchers are working to tackle these questions. Meanwhile, after reading a newspaper article about breast and ovarian cancer in women who carried deleterious mutations but had no family history of disease, one Science reporter decided to get tested. Despite many years spent covering genetic testing, she had never turned the lens on her own DNA. The experience proved more unnerving and scientifically intriguing than she expected.