Mucosal Immunology

For gut T cells, it's location, location, location

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Science  16 Oct 2015:
Vol. 350, Issue 6258, pp. 289-290
DOI: 10.1126/science.350.6258.289-e

Bacteria that adhere to intestinal epihelial cells induce T helper 17 cells

PHOTO: IVANOV ET AL., MUCOSAL IMMUNOLOGY (10 FEBRUARY 2010) © 2010 NATURE

Specific members of the gut microbiota promote the development of different subsets of T lymphocytes in the guta, thereby modulating gut immunity. One example is segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB), which drive the differentiation of T helper 17 (TH17) cells. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that support this process remain poorly understood. Atarashi et al. now demonstrate that several species of bacteria able to adhere to intestinal epithelial cells, including SFB, drive TH17 cell differentiation in rodents. Sano et al. found that SFB primed TH17 cells in mesenteric lymph nodes. However, these cells only produced interleukin-17, their signature cytokine, in regions of the gut where SFB makes contact with epithelial cells that secrete the inflammatory protein serum amyloid A.

Cell 10.1016/j.cell.2015.08.058; 10.1016/j.cell.2015.08.061 (2015).

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