ReportsDevelopment

Drosophila insulin release is triggered by adipose Stunted ligand to brain Methuselah receptor

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science  30 Sep 2016:
Vol. 353, Issue 6307, pp. 1553-1556
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf8430

You are currently viewing the abstract.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Abstract

Animals adapt their growth rate and body size to available nutrients by a general modulation of insulin–insulin-like growth factor signaling. In Drosophila, dietary amino acids promote the release in the hemolymph of brain insulin-like peptides (Dilps), which in turn activate systemic organ growth. Dilp secretion by insulin-producing cells involves a relay through unknown cytokines produced by fat cells. Here, we identify Methuselah (Mth) as a secretin-incretin receptor subfamily member required in the insulin-producing cells for proper nutrient coupling. We further show, using genetic and ex vivo organ culture experiments, that the Mth ligand Stunted (Sun) is a circulating insulinotropic peptide produced by fat cells. Therefore, Sun and Mth define a new cross-organ circuitry that modulates physiological insulin levels in response to nutrients.

View Full Text