Microporous Compounds

Creating a polybenzene network

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Science  21 Oct 2016:
Vol. 354, Issue 6310, pp. 298-299
DOI: 10.1126/science.354.6310.298-e

Metal-organic framework (MOF) compounds are microporous materials in which inorganic centers are linked with organic ligands. Some network topologies, such as the diamond lattice, are formed by many MOFs, whereas others require specific linker positioning. One of the most difficult to form is the polybenzene (pbz) network that results from connecting phenyl rings via single carbon-carbon bonds into a three-dimensional network. Alezi et al. show that a six-connected hexagonal zirconium(IV) cluster can link a hexagonal ligand (a phenyl group substituted with carboxylate-terminated biphenyl groups) to form a pbz network. Structural studies verified an appropriate dihedral angle (70.5°) between the central phenyl ring of the linker and the hexagonal zirconium center. The material is not high-porosity but achieves high uptakes of methane at high pressures.

Cartoon of a zirconium-based metal-organic framework with the polybenzene (pbz) structure

PHOTO: DUBEY ET AL., DEVELOPMENTAL CELL 38 (12 SEPTEMBER 2016) © CELL PRESS

J. Am. Chem. Soc. 10.1021/jacs.6b08176 (2016).

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