Research Article

Reovirus infection triggers inflammatory responses to dietary antigens and development of celiac disease

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Science  07 Apr 2017:
Vol. 356, Issue 6333, pp. 44-50
DOI: 10.1126/science.aah5298

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Viruses compound dietary pathology

Reoviruses commonly infect humans and mice asymptomatically. Bouziat et al. found that immune responses to two gut-infecting reoviruses take different paths in mice (see the Perspective by Verdu and Caminero). Both reoviruses invoked protective immune responses, but for one reovirus, when infection happened in the presence of a dietary antigen (such as gluten or ovalbumin), tolerance to the dietary antigen was lost. This was because this strain prevented the formation of tolerogenic T cells. Instead, it promoted T helper 1 immunity to the dietary antigen through interferon regulatory factor 1 signaling. Celiac disease patients also exhibited elevated levels of antibodies against reovirus.

Science, this issue p. 44; see also p. 29

Abstract

Viral infections have been proposed to elicit pathological processes leading to the initiation of T helper 1 (TH1) immunity against dietary gluten and celiac disease (CeD). To test this hypothesis and gain insights into mechanisms underlying virus-induced loss of tolerance to dietary antigens, we developed a viral infection model that makes use of two reovirus strains that infect the intestine but differ in their immunopathological outcomes. Reovirus is an avirulent pathogen that elicits protective immunity, but we discovered that it can nonetheless disrupt intestinal immune homeostasis at inductive and effector sites of oral tolerance by suppressing peripheral regulatory T cell (pTreg) conversion and promoting TH1 immunity to dietary antigen. Initiation of TH1 immunity to dietary antigen was dependent on interferon regulatory factor 1 and dissociated from suppression of pTreg conversion, which was mediated by type-1 interferon. Last, our study in humans supports a role for infection with reovirus, a seemingly innocuous virus, in triggering the development of CeD.

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