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Increase in predator-prey size ratios throughout the Phanerozoic history of marine ecosystems

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Science  16 Jun 2017:
Vol. 356, Issue 6343, pp. 1178-1180
DOI: 10.1126/science.aam7468
  • Fig. 1 Log10-scaled outer drill-hole diameter versus shell length for modern drilling clades.

    Reduced major axis regression line supplemented by 95% bootstrapped confidence intervals and bootstrapped r values in histogram (both 1000 iterations). Driller family names are shown with sample sizes. Nematod family is not known. Circles, Gastropoda; diamond, Nematoda; triangle, Foraminifera; squares, Cercozoa; inverted triangle, Arthropoda. Log10 slope = 0.94; intercept = –1.09.

  • Fig. 2 Log10-scaled boxplots of prey size, predator size, and the predator-prey size ratio in Phanerozoic brachiopods and mollusks.

    (A) Prey size (shell area). (B) Predator size (drill-hole diameter). (C) Predator-prey size ratio (= proportional to the percentage of shell area drilled). Boxplot widths are Embedded Image (where n ranges from 13 to 54 per boxplot). (Inset) Support for three evolutionary models. The strict stasis model receives no support in any case. Geological periods: Є, Cambrian; O, Ordovician; S, Silurian; D, Devonian; C, Carboniferous; P, Permian; T, Triassic; J, Jurassic; K, Cretaceous; Pg, Paleogene; Ng, Neogene; Q, Quaternary.

Supplementary Materials

  • Increase in predator-prey size ratios throughout the Phanerozoic history of marine ecosystems

    Adiël A. Klompmaker, Michał Kowalewski, John Warren Huntley, Seth Finnegan

    Materials/Methods, Supplementary Text, Tables, Figures, and/or References

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    • Materials and Methods 
    • Figs. S1 to S22 
    • Tables S1 to S22 
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