In DepthNeuroscience

In thousands of brain scans, group seeks clues to diseases

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Science  26 Jan 2018:
Vol. 359, Issue 6374, pp. 377-378
DOI: 10.1126/science.359.6374.377

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Summary

After a slow start, the ENIGMA consortium has brought together nearly 900 researchers across 39 countries to analyze brain scans and genetic data on more than 30,000 people. In an accelerating series of publications, ENIGMA's crowdsourcing approach is opening windows on how genes and structure relate in the normal brain—and in disease. This week, for example, an ENIGMA study published in the journal Brain compared scans from nearly 4000 people across Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Australia to pinpoint unexpected brain abnormalities associated with common epilepsies. ENIGMA is "an outstanding effort. We should all be doing more of this," says Mohammed Milad, a neuroscientist at the University of Illinois in Chicago who is not a member of the consortium.