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Is FDA's revolving door open too wide?

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Science  06 Jul 2018:
Vol. 361, Issue 6397, pp. 21
DOI: 10.1126/science.361.6397.21

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Summary

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says its rules, along with federal laws, stop employees from improperly cashing in on their government service. But how adequate are those revolving door controls? Much like outside advisers (see main story, p. 16), however, regular employees at the agency, headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland, often reap later rewards—jobs or consulting work—from the makers of the drugs they previously regulated. Through web searches and online services such as LinkedIn, Science has discovered that 11 of 16 FDA medical examiners who worked on 28 drug approvals and then left the agency for new jobs are now employed by or consult for the companies they recently regulated. This can create at least the appearance of conflicts of interest.