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Daring to hope

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Science  24 Aug 2018:
Vol. 361, Issue 6404, pp. 742-746
DOI: 10.1126/science.361.6404.742

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  • Are we on the right track in medical research?

    Meredith Wadman wrote an article entitled “Daring to hope” (1). From the Lancet, only one in 20 people worldwide (4.3%) had no health problems in 2013, with a third of the world's population (2.3 billion individuals) experiencing more than five ailments (2,3). According to the German government, only around a third of the approximately 30,000 diseases known today can be adequately treated (4). The term "cure" means that, after medical treatment, the patient no longer has that particular condition anymore. The term“treatment” is used in health care to imply a process to manage the disease or disorder and improve outcomes. The Washington Post described the interview on Fox News Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016 with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) (5). The interview stated that there are 10,000 diseases, and we only have 500 cures (5). Whether we have 30,000 diseases or 10,000 diseases, global spending on health is expected to increase to $18.28 trillion worldwide by 2040 (6). Are we on the right track in medical research?

    References:
    1. Meredith Wadman, Daring to hope, Science 24 Aug 2018: Vol. 361, Issue 6404, pp. 742-746
    2.https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(15)60692-4/fulltext
    3.https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150608081753.htm
    4...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.