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A general reinforcement learning algorithm that masters chess, shogi, and Go through self-play

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Science  07 Dec 2018:
Vol. 362, Issue 6419, pp. 1140-1144
DOI: 10.1126/science.aar6404

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One program to rule them all

Computers can beat humans at increasingly complex games, including chess and Go. However, these programs are typically constructed for a particular game, exploiting its properties, such as the symmetries of the board on which it is played. Silver et al. developed a program called AlphaZero, which taught itself to play Go, chess, and shogi (a Japanese version of chess) (see the Editorial, and the Perspective by Campbell). AlphaZero managed to beat state-of-the-art programs specializing in these three games. The ability of AlphaZero to adapt to various game rules is a notable step toward achieving a general game-playing system.

Science, this issue p. 1140; see also pp. 1087 and 1118