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Science  18 Jan 2019:
Vol. 363, Issue 6424, pp. 208-210
DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6424.208

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  • RE: Like the loss of last wild Caribou of contiguous United States has the countdown of musk deer in the Himalayas also begun?
    • Ira Tewari, Teaching and Research, Department of Forestry and Environmental Science, Kumaun University, Nainital-263001 (Uttarakhand), India

    E-letter to news article entitled “The contiguous United States just lost its last wild caribou” by David Moskovitz published on Jan, 18, 2019 in Science DOI:10.1126/science.aaw7110

    Like the loss of last wild Caribou of contiguous United States has the countdown of musk deer in the Himalayas also begun?

    By Ira Tewari, Department of Forestry and Environmental Science, Kumaun University, Nainital-263001, (Uttarakhand), India, E-mail: iratewari@yahoo.com

    The letter published in Science on January 18, 2019 issue entitled ‘The contiguous United States just lost its last wild caribou’ by David Moskovitz (1) is very explicitly portraying the issue of endangerment and eventual extinction of a species from its habitat. It is a very pathetic state to be losing the last surviving individual from the regions of its occurrence. The loss of the last ‘caribou’ from the United States sets an alarming bell for the global community deciphering that the day is not far when many of such other floral and faunal species will be gone forever. The fate of species in the developing nations is getting worse with each new day.
    Since past 10,000 years, the earth’s temperature has been rising constantly, thereby melting of polar ice-sheets, rising sea-water levels leading to habitat destruction and extinction of many floral and faunal species. More than 99 percent of all species, amounting to over five billion species that ever li...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.