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OBSERVATIONS UPON THE FILTERABILITY OF BACTERIA, INCLUDING A FILTERABLE ORGANISM OBTAINED FROM CASES OF INFLUENZA

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Science  07 Aug 1931:
Vol. 74, Issue 1910, pp. 129-139
DOI: 10.1126/science.74.1910.129

Abstract

1. The isolation of a filter-passing diplococcus from the blood of certain cases of influenza by means of a special cultural medium is described. The experimental effects of this organism, while in the filterable state, upon rabbits, is discussed.

2. A procedure is formulated for inducing at will both a filterable and a non-filterable state in bacteria. Mention is made of a series of experiments in which both the filterable and the non-filterable state has thus been induced in a series of well-known bacteria comprising a variety of types.

3. It is postulated that a majority, if not all, known bacteria can and do exist in a filterable and in a non-filterable state.

4. A preliminary report of the isolation of microbes in the blood, not only of cases of influenza, but also from common cold, rheumatic fever, arthritis, from Staphylococcus bacteriophage and Besredka's Staphylococcus Antivirus is presented in evidence of the ubiquity of the procedure.

5. An explanation of the chemical basis for the existence of bacteria, both in the filterable and non-filterable states, in the animal and human body, and in culture, is proferred.

6. The relation of this chemical concept to microbic infection, and the state of microbes in the body during infection is discussed.

In conclusion, it is a privilege as well as a pleasure to inscribe here my appreciation for the courteous cooperation of Dean Irving S. Cutter, Doctors Charles A. Elliott, Paul Starr, James G. Carr, Walter Nadler, Howard Alt and Herbert Barker, of the department of medicine, and to Northwestern University for the generous facilities and unrestricted opportunity for research which have contributed immeasurably to this investigation.