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A PRELIMINARY NOTE ON THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE PHOSPHORUS INTAKE IN THE DIET AND BLOOD PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATION, IN THE EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION OF CARIES-IMMUNITY AND CARIES-SUSCEPTIBILITY IN THE RAT

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Science  25 Dec 1931:
Vol. 74, Issue 1930, pp. 662-664
DOI: 10.1126/science.74.1930.662-a

Abstract

(1) Estimations of the phosphorus content of diets reported to produce caries in rats indicate that rations containing 0.4802 grams of phosphorus per 100 grams of diet, or less than 0.4802 grams of phosphorus per 100 grams of diet, tend to induce dental caries in rats if Ca intake is 0.3424 per cent.

(2) Estimations of the phosphorus content of diets reported to produce rats immune to dental caries indicate that such diets contain 0.5282 or more grams of phosphorus per 100 grams of diet and 0.4012 or less grams of calcium per 100 grams of diet.

(3) Experimental evidence is presented which indicates that the level of phosphorus in the diet is an important factor in producing caries-susceptibility and caries-immunity in rats.

(4) We have also found that a relation exists between blood composition (phosphorus) and the incidence of dental caries in rats. Caries arises in rats whose blood phosphorus falls below a critical level (about 10.5 ± .5 mg6 of phosphorus per 100 grams of serum), while those rats whose blood phosphorus concentration is 10.5 ± .5 or above are immune from dental caries.

(5) It is indicated that this blood figure is dependent upon the level of phosphorus, calcium and vitamin ingested in the diet.

In a forthcoming paper we shall present the results of an extensive review of the recorded observations of our own and other laboratories on the relation between diet and susceptibility to dental caries in the rat and our conclusions from examining these data in the light of the working hypothesis (blood phosphorus critical level) here presented.