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Use of CRISPR-modified human stem cell organoids to study the origin of mutational signatures in cancer

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Science  14 Sep 2017:
eaao3130
DOI: 10.1126/science.aao3130

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Abstract

Mutational processes underlie cancer initiation and progression. Signatures of these processes in cancer genomes may explain cancer etiology, and hold diagnostic and prognostic value. Here, we develop a strategy that can be used to explore the origin of cancer-associated mutational signatures. We used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to delete key DNA repair genes in human colon organoids, followed by delayed sub-cloning and whole-genome sequencing. We found that mutation accumulation in organoids deficient in the mismatch repair gene MLH1 is driven by replication errors and accurately models the mutation profiles observed in mismatch repair-deficient colorectal cancers. Application of this strategy to the cancer predisposition gene NTHL1, which encodes a base excision repair protein, revealed a mutational footprint (signature 30) previously observed in a breast cancer cohort. We show that signature 30 can arise from germline NTHL1 mutations.

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