Supporting Online Material


Abstract
Full Text
A Self-Organized Vortex Array of Hydrodynamically Entrained Sperm Cells
Ingmar H. Riedel, Karsten Kruse, Jonathon Howard

Supporting Online Material

This file is in Adobe Acrobat PDF format. If you have not installed and configured the Adobe Acrobat Reader on your system, please see Help with Printing for instructions.

This supplement contains:

Materials and Methods
SOM Text
Figures S1 to S6
Movies S1 to S5
References

Download supplement

To view these movies, download a QuickTime viewer.
  • Movie 1
    Phase contrast movie showing a single spermatozoon swimming close to a surface. Scale: Length of head is about 10 μm. Original frame rate: 250 fps; replay: all frames at 7.5 fps. (QuickTime; 1 MB)
  • Movie 2
    Dark field movie showing a vortex array of sperm cells at a surface density of 6000 cells/mm2. Scale: Length of head is about 10 μm. Original frame rate: 250 fps; replay: every 8th frame shown at 30 fps hence roughly real time. (QuickTime; 5.1 MB)
  • Movie 3
    Movie S3. Same movie as (movie S2), but replayed slower. Original frame rate: 250 fps; replay: all frames shown at 10 fps. (QuickTime; 3.8 MB)
  • Movie 4
    Movie S4. Phase contrast movie showing seven spermatozoa within a single vortex at a surface density of 4000 cells/mm2. This movie was used for the data presented in Fig. 3. Scale: Length of head is about 10 name m. Original frame rate: 250 fps; replay: all frames at 15 fps. (QuickTime; 9 MB)
  • Movie 5
    Movie S5. Dark-field contrast movies at different sperm surface densities (700, 2500, 4700 cells/mm2) corresponding to values below, in the vicinity of, and above the critical density. These movies (among others) were used to generate the data in Fig. 4E. Original frame rate: 17 fps; replay: all frames shown at 15 fps. (QuickTime; 6.1 MB)
The circling motion of the spermatozoa appears clockwise or anti-clockwise in the videos, depending on whether the spermatozoa were imaged at the upper or lower surface. From inside the water phase, the spermatozoa always appear to circle clockwise.