Supporting Online Material


LIFE IN SCIENCE: Sounds of Atoms
Paul S. Weiss and Stephan J. Stranick

Supporting Online Material

This supplement contains:

75A video file avi 15.7 MB
Scanning tunneling microscope image and associated audio signature. The tunneling current is fed into one channel of a stereo, and the feedback loop voltage controlling the tip-sample separation is turned into a tone (carrier frequency 165 Hz) and fed into the other, while a self-assembled monolayer of alkanethiols on Au{111} is imaged with molecular resolution at 4 K in extreme high vacuum. The wobbling tone is the feedback loop. Other sounds are indicators of the correct operation and the levels of noise in the system. Video file credit: Patrick Han, Adam Kurland, and Paul Weiss, the Pennsylvania State University.

100A video file avi 22.1 MB
Scanning tunneling microscope image and associated audio signature. The tunneling current is fed into one channel of a stereo, and the feedback loop voltage controlling the tip-sample separation is turned into a tone (carrier frequency 160 Hz) and fed into the other, while a self-assembled monolayer of alkanethiols on Au{111} is imaged with molecular resolution at 4 K in extreme high vacuum. The wobbling tone is the feedback loop. Other sounds are indicators of the correct operation and the levels of noise in the system. Video file credit: Patrick Han, Adam Kurland, and Paul Weiss, the Pennsylvania State University.

audio file
mp3 580 KB
Listening to the coarse approach of the scanning tunneling microscope tip to the surface. The tunneling current and the feedback loop are monitored during the approach. These diagnostic sounds indicate that the approach is working properly. At 23 seconds, the tip reaches and is maintained in tunneling range. Sound file credit: Patrick Han, Adam Kurland, and Paul Weiss, the Pennsylvania State University.

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