Report

Political Attitudes Vary with Physiological Traits

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Science  19 Sep 2008:
Vol. 321, Issue 5896, pp. 1667-1670
DOI: 10.1126/science.1157627

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  • Response to J. C. Gewirtz and B. N. Cuthbert's E-Letter

    In our Report ("Political attitudes vary with physiological traits," D. R. Hibbing et al., 19 September 2009, p. 1667) we present evidence that individuals displaying greater blink amplitudes subsequent to auditory startles and greater skin conductance increases in response to threatening visual images are more likely to hold a collection of political beliefs that we label "protective" (these beliefs include support of...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.
  • Are Fearfulness and Protectiveness Characteristics of Social Conservatives?

    D. R. Oxley et al. ("Political attitudes vary with physiological traits," Reports, 19 September 2008, p. 1667) reported that individuals who expressed strongly conservative attitudes on fourteen social issues (e.g., support for the death penalty and biblical truth; opposition to gun control and gay marriage) showed higher skin conductance responses to threatening pictures and higher startle reactivity than individuals...

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    Competing Interests: None declared.

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