PerspectiveELECTROCHEMISTRY

How conducting polymer electrodes operate

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science  19 Apr 2019:
Vol. 364, Issue 6437, pp. 233-234
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw9295

You are currently viewing the summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Summary

Organic electrochemical devices, which use conjugated polymers in contact with an electrolyte, have applications in bioelectronics, energy storage, electrocatalysis, and sensors (1, 2). Their operation relies on the oxidation (electron loss) or reduction (electron gain) of the polymer, which are traditionally described as Faradaic processes that transfer charge (3). However, recent evidence from various devices based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) chemically doped with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is consistent with a purely capacitive process that stores charge (4). To clarify whether PEDOT:PSS is an exception or the rule and determine which processes are capacitive and which are Faradaic, solid-state physics methodology developed to understand the operation of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) can be used (5). Such studies can pave the way for device optimization.

View Full Text