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Strongly correlated quantum walks with a 12-qubit superconducting processor

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Science  24 May 2019:
Vol. 364, Issue 6442, pp. 753-756
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw1611

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Quantum walks on a superconducting circuit

Quantum walks generate large-scale quantum superposed states. This allows for classically unavailable applications, such as simulating many-body quantum systems, and also yields quantum algorithms exponentially faster than classical computation. Yan et al. demonstrate quantum walks of one and two strongly correlated microwave photons in a one-dimensional array of 12 superconducting qubits with short-range interactions. The scalability of the superconducting platform could lead to large-scale implementations and the quantum simulation of complex systems.

Science, this issue p. 753

Abstract

Quantum walks are the quantum analogs of classical random walks, which allow for the simulation of large-scale quantum many-body systems and the realization of universal quantum computation without time-dependent control. We experimentally demonstrate quantum walks of one and two strongly correlated microwave photons in a one-dimensional array of 12 superconducting qubits with short-range interactions. First, in one-photon quantum walks, we observed the propagation of the density and correlation of the quasiparticle excitation of the superconducting qubit and quantum entanglement between qubit pairs. Second, when implementing two-photon quantum walks by exciting two superconducting qubits, we observed the fermionization of strongly interacting photons from the measured time-dependent long-range anticorrelations, representing the antibunching of photons with attractive interactions. The demonstration of quantum walks on a quantum processor, using superconducting qubits as artificial atoms and tomographic readout, paves the way to quantum simulation of many-body phenomena and universal quantum computation.

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