PerspectiveGenome Editing

Inserting DNA with CRISPR

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science  05 Jul 2019:
Vol. 365, Issue 6448, pp. 25-26
DOI: 10.1126/science.aay2056

You are currently viewing the summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Summary

Most prokaryotes rely on the CRISPR-Cas system for adaptive immunity against viruses and mobile elements (1, 2). Small RNAs produced from CRISPR direct Cas effector proteins to seek and destroy nucleic acids from invaders that have complementary target sites (3). There are multiple types of CRISPR, which are defined on the basis of their protein composition. Recently, RNA-guided nucleases from types II and V CRISPR systems, Cas9 and Cas12, have revolutionized genome editing by allowing programmed DNA sequence alterations (4). However, robust and targeted insertion of a large DNA segment into eukaryotic genomes has remained challenging. On page 48 of this issue, Strecker et al. (5) show that a CRISPR-associated transposase (CAST) mediates highly efficient, RNA-guided insertion of cargo DNA into the bacterial Escherichia coli genome. Moreover, Klompe et al. (6) report another CRISPR-guided DNA transposase system that operates similarly. These studies offer new tools that could transform genetic engineering and gene therapy research.

View Full Text