PerspectiveChemistry

How to make interlocked nanocarbons

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science  19 Jul 2019:
Vol. 365, Issue 6450, pp. 216-217
DOI: 10.1126/science.aay2861

You are currently viewing the summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Summary

Carbon-rich materials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene have a wide range of unusual physical properties resulting from their unique topography. For example, graphene, a two-dimensional sheet material consisting solely of carbon atoms, is a zero-gap semiconductor (1). When this same material is rolled into a cylindrical topology—a carbon nanotube—the resulting material can be either metallic or semiconducting, depending on the specific atom connectivity. Many other molecular entities can be synthesized entirely from carbon (2). On page 272 of this issue, Segawa et al. (3) report the synthesis of nanocarbons that are mechanically interlocked. These mechanically bound nanocarbons create a bridge between carbon nanoscience and research into molecular machines.

View Full Text