In DepthMICROBIAL ECOLOGY

No microbiome is an island, survey reveals

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science  30 Aug 2019:
Vol. 365, Issue 6456, pp. 851
DOI: 10.1126/science.365.6456.851

You are currently viewing the summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Summary

Almost every plant and animal depends on its own world of microbes to thrive and those microbiomes are part of a larger ecosystem, findings from a Hawaiian valley suggest. Researchers have tended to study microbiomes and their hosts, such as the microbial communities in animal guts or the nitrogen-fixing bacteria on legume roots, in isolation. But by sampling and analyzing bacteria and other microbes throughout Oahu's Waimea Valley, a team has found that each organism's complement of microbes is a subset of what exists in the broader environment and in or on organisms lower on the food web. The work grew out of the hiring of about two dozen faculty interested in microbiomes and has led to a much better understanding of how microbes move within and across environments.

View Full Text