In DepthChemistry

Lithium-ion battery development takes Nobel

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Science  18 Oct 2019:
Vol. 366, Issue 6463, pp. 292
DOI: 10.1126/science.366.6463.292

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Summary

Nobel-worthy research is sometimes hard to grasp. But this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner isn't: The prize was awarded last week to the pioneers of the lithium-ion battery, an invention that permeates modern life, in phones, laptops, and even cars. Lighter and more compact than the rechargeable batteries that preceded them, lithium-ion batteries are now moving beyond gadgets to power homes, airplanes, and even the electric grid that feeds power to entire cities. Three chemists will split the $900,000 prize: Stanley Whittingham at the State University of New York in Binghamton, John Goodenough at the University of Texas in Austin, and Akira Yoshino at Asahi Kasei Corporation in Tokyo.

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