In DepthScientific Workforce

Universities move to stop passing the harasser

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science  29 Nov 2019:
Vol. 366, Issue 6469, pp. 1057
DOI: 10.1126/science.366.6469.1057

You are currently viewing the summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Summary

The #MeToo movement has shone a spotlight on an ugly tradition in higher education: allowing faculty members found guilty of bullying or sexual harassment to move to a new job without telling the new employer about their past conduct. But major research universities are taking steps to penetrate the veil of silence that abets the practice of "passing the harasser." The Davis and San Diego campuses of the University of California system are conducting pilot programs that ask certain faculty candidates to waive some privacy protections, and earlier this month the University of Illinois Board of Trustees adopted the recommendations of a faculty group to conduct a similar pilot. Even as universities move to tackle the issue, however, an engineering professor recently worked for 18 months at the National Science Foundation before the agency learned he had been suspended for bullying. Although he was promptly removed, the case highlights the lack of transparency in hiring practices.

View Full Text

Stay Connected to Science