Books et al.Classics Revisited

Arbiters of truth, then and now

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Science  29 Nov 2019:
Vol. 366, Issue 6469, pp. 1081
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaz3045

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Summary

In the 1970s, sociologist Bruno Latour wanted to observe how scientific facts emerged in real time. Preferring not to rely on researchers' own accounts of how discoveries were made, he was keen to witness scientists work in situ. To achieve this, he served for 2 years as a resident anthropologist in Roger Guillemin's laboratory at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The account of his stay, coauthored with Steve Woolgar and published 40 years ago under the title Laboratory Life: The Social Construction of Scientific Facts, raised contentious questions about the nature of scientific truths.

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