PerspectiveNANOMATERIALS

Two-dimensional polymers grow up

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Science  13 Dec 2019:
Vol. 366, Issue 6471, pp. 1308-1309
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaz9326

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Summary

Creating tunable and highly conductive two-dimensional polymers (2DPs) using organic chemistry has been a goal since the isolation of graphene (1, 2). The high surface area and well-defined pore sizes make 2DPs attractive for a range of applications, including sensors, electronics, catalysis, energy storage, and energy conversion. Conjugated 2DPs, which have alternating single and double bonds that enable electron delocalization, are promising materials for optoelectronics. They have high predicted carrier mobilities and semiconducting behavior that contrasts with the metal-like properties of graphene (3). Challenges in scaling up from the laboratory have prevented different types of 2DPs from making the leap to practical applications. On page 1379 of this issue, Zhong et al. (4) report a synthetic method that solves many difficulties related to isolating and processing 2DPs and fabricate a simple large-area electronic device.

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