In DepthBiomedicine

Long-acting drug acts like a short-term AIDS vaccine

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Science  22 May 2020:
Vol. 368, Issue 6493, pp. 807
DOI: 10.1126/science.368.6493.807

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Summary

A long-acting antiretroviral drug given as an injection every 2 months powerfully protected uninfected people from HIV in a large-scale clinical trial. Although it was cut short by the COVID-19 pandemic and has not been published in a peer-reviewed journal or presented at a meeting, the study holds out hope of preventing HIV infections in high-risk groups without the need to take pills every day, which many people find difficult. The trial, sponsored by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, compared the experimental drug cabotegravir with Truvada, a daily pill combining two antiretroviral compounds that is the standard regimen for pre-exposure prophylaxis. The overall result indicates cabotegravir works just as well as Truvada, and perhaps even better.

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