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Hard lessons

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Science  22 May 2020:
Vol. 368, Issue 6493, pp. 814-817
DOI: 10.1126/science.368.6493.814

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Summary

For nearly 2 decades, Carlos Castillo-Chavez has presided over a mini-empire of programs at Arizona State University, Tempe, that are designed to increase diversity within the math community. The Mexican-born mathematical biologist has trained some 50 Ph.D. students, two-thirds of whom belong to groups historically underrepresented in science. He is especially proud of his "diamonds in the rough"—students from less selective undergraduate programs who have ended up with good jobs in academia, industry, and the public sector. But some colleagues and students have raised questions about his approach to mentoring, and last week Castillo-Chavez retired with that empire in disarray. Here's a look at what happened.

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