PerspectiveEcology

Costs and benefits of living with predators

See allHide authors and affiliations

Science  12 Jun 2020:
Vol. 368, Issue 6496, pp. 1178-1180
DOI: 10.1126/science.abc7060

You are currently viewing the summary.

View Full Text

Log in to view the full text

Log in through your institution

Log in through your institution

Summary

Although money isn't everything, today's world operates by means of capitalism. This fundamental truth has led to an intersection between economics and ecology wherein natural resources and ecological processes are often valued in monetary terms. A central challenge to the intersection of ecology and natural resource management is thus twofold—understanding ecological processes and valuing the outcomes. Nowhere has this challenge caused more confusion and debate than in the arena of decision-making about how to conserve and manage large predators. On page 1243 of this issue, Gregr et al. (1) evaluate the recovery of an apex predator—sea otters in the Canadian Pacific coast—and report that certain economies have been either negatively or positively affected by sea otter restoration, but the overall economic outcomes are positive.

View Full Text

Stay Connected to Science