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Lizard man

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Science  31 Jul 2020:
Vol. 369, Issue 6503, pp. 496-499
DOI: 10.1126/science.369.6503.496

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Summary

In the 1990s, a hurricane washed away lizards that were part of Jonathan Losos's evolution experiments. But the setback was the start of a new chapter in this herpetologist's research on how the animals adapt to the varied, changeable environments on islands in and around the Caribbean. Since then, he and his colleagues have been collecting data on how the animals adapt to predators, storm damage, and other challenges—natural and those contrived by the researchers. A lifelong reptile enthusiast, Losos is driven in part by his passion for a group of lizards called anoles, which thrive in South and Central America and throughout the Caribbean. The animals' diverse lifestyles, habitats, and histories have proved to be a vehicle for exploring some of the biggest questions in evolution.

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