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Fed-up archaeologists aim to fix field schools' party culture

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Science  14 Aug 2020:
Vol. 369, Issue 6505, pp. 757-758
DOI: 10.1126/science.369.6505.757

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Summary

Each year undergraduate archaeology students can choose from hundreds of field schools, where they learn hands-on skills such as excavation. Field schools are required to enter graduate school in archaeology or to land a job in the discipline. But information passed privately in archaeology's whisper networks reveals some field schools have a reputation for faculty who sexually harass with impunity. Many are also famed for heavy drinking. And nearly all of them cost students thousands of dollars, keeping those of modest means out of archaeology altogether. Now, some archaeologists are trying to change the script. With the help of a National Science Foundation grant, a group is studying, and plans to implement, best practices for preventing sexual harassment at field schools. Others are rethinking the whole model: They teach field skills at local sites during the regular semester.

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