PerspectiveBiomedicine

The gut microbiota in kidney disease

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Science  18 Sep 2020:
Vol. 369, Issue 6510, pp. 1426-1427
DOI: 10.1126/science.abd8344

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Summary

Chronic kidney disease affects 9% of the global population (1) and can have severe impacts on both the individual and societal levels. Although various conditions, such as diabetes, are well known risk factors for chronic kidney disease, in recent years interest has been growing regarding a potential role for the gut microbiota in modulating outcomes in kidney disease (2). Simultaneously, in the microbiology field, there has been a growing appreciation for the intersection of diet and the gut microbiota as a driver of changes in host health (3). To date, a common model has been that diet acts to alter the relative abundances (or diversity) of gut microbes, which can then lead to changes in gut microbial metabolite production (4). However, on page 1518 of this issue, Lobel et al. (5) report that diet can posttranslationally modify the gut microbial proteome, which can alter microbial metabolite production to drive changes in renal function.

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