In DepthClimate Science

Sizing up a green carbon sink

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Science  25 Sep 2020:
Vol. 369, Issue 6511, pp. 1557
DOI: 10.1126/science.369.6511.1557

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Summary

Forests are having their moment. Because trees can vacuum carbon from the atmosphere and lock it away in wood, governments and businesses are embracing efforts to fight climate change by reforesting cleared areas and planting trees on a massive scale. But scientists have warned that the enthusiasm and money flowing to forest-based climate solutions threaten to outpace the science. Two papers published this week seek to put such efforts on a firmer footing. One study quantifies how much carbon might be absorbed globally by allowing forests cleared for farming or other purposes to regrow. The other calculates how much carbon could be sequestered by forests in the United States if they were fully "stocked" with newly planted trees. Each strategy has promise, the studies suggest, but also faces perils.

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