Books et al.Quantum Mechanics

Understanding quantum cause and effect

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Science  25 Sep 2020:
Vol. 369, Issue 6511, pp. 1573
DOI: 10.1126/science.abe0805

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Summary

If you read a randomly selected nontechnical account of quantum entanglement, you will likely be told that measuring a particle in one place can instantly change another particle elsewhere, no matter the distance between the two. Surprisingly, this is something that Paul Halpern never claims in his new book, Synchronicity. As the title implies, the central concept of his century-spanning tale is "synchronicity," a term coined by psychoanalyst Carl Jung, who was inspired by conversations with physicists Albert Einstein and Wolfgang Pauli, to connote an "acausal connecting principle." Quantum correlations, in Halpern's view, are a special case of synchronicity.

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